Tag Archives: SCD

Super Easy Blueberry Coconut Milk Pudding

If you have read some of my previous posts, you know that I am eternally searching for new and interesting recipes for my daughter. She has become a bit of a picky eater and as we all do, we get bored with the same foods, over and over. I had a spark of imagination one day, while preparing lunches for the kids. I threw the items together so quickly and chucked it into the fridge so it had a couple of minutes to chill. To make a long story short, she liked it, so try it and perhaps you and your children will do the same.

I made little portion cups and took them to school. You could modify the recipe to make larger portions if you wish. I now make this for my own lunches and it is like yogurt and fruit. So good!

These amounts are flexible. Use your best judgement.

3-4 oz of your favourite non-dairy milk. I like coconut milk.

3-4 tbls of frozen berries. I used blueberries/raspberries for my last recipe

1/2 tbls of your best maple syrup

2 tsp of chia seeds and hemp hulls if you like.

I like to store in small mason type jars and put into the fridge until you want to eat it. It will be good for about 2 days.

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Mini Pumpkin Tart Paleo GF

Last year for Thanksgiving, I was new to the Paleo diet and wanted my daughter to get that pumpkin pie that she asked me for, so I did! Danielle Walker and her wonderful recipe saved the day and everyone said they loved it.

This year, I am working and won’t be able to be there but still wanted to do something and had seen a recipe for mini pumpkin tarts. It sounded and looked so good that I had to try it.

Despite having very little time (I am feeling confident enough now) I took the leap and went all in!

Now that I have been cooking this way for awhile it seemed pretty easy.

I found that this tart recipe made double the amount, for me. I would suggest that you keep wetting your fingers, to keep from sticking to the pie shell as you are pressing it into the muffin cups.  I was unsure how thick I had to leave the crust for this time and will know better for next. It does raise up a bit, so I would press it a bit thinner than I originally thought it should be.

Next time, I would like to use fresh pumpkins to make up the filling, but this time I used the canned version.

This recipe turned out really good. I am very proud and I am still waiting to hear how the family liked it. Cross my fingers that they like it as much as I did!!

Be healthy and enjoy today.

AUTHOR: Beth – Tasty Yummies

SERVES: 12 mini tarts

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups almond flour
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup*
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil, melted
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • dash of ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt

Filling

  • 1/2 cup raw cashews, soaked for at least 4 hours, preferably overnight
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup*
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 cup fresh pumpkin puree (see my post on how to make your own, canned will also do)
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil, melted
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • a pinch of ground cloves
  • a dash of sea salt

Whipped Coconut Cream

  •  1 can organic full fat coconut milk, refrigerated overnight
  • 2 teaspoons maple syrup (use more or less or none at all, or whatever your favorite sweetener is)*
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla

*Maple can be substituted 1:1 for honey if you follow SCD

Instructions:

Shells

  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF. Line 12 cups in a muffin tin with paper liners (you could also use greased mini tart pans).
  2. In a large bowl, add all of the crust ingredients and mix very well. Really get your hands in there to get it all together and work it into a nice dough.
  3. Add the crust mixture to the muffin cups and press down firmly into the cup using your knuckles, going up the sides a tad bit.
  4. Bake for 15-20 minutes until golden brown.
  5. Allow to cool in the pan for about 10 minutes, then place the pan in the refrigerator until you are ready to assemble the tarts and serve. (Many times I make the tart shells the night before and keep them in the fridge until I am ready to serve)

Filling

  1. Drain the cashews and add them to your food processor and give them a whirl by themselves for a bit, to break them up and start turning them into a paste of sorts.
  2. Once the cashews are broken up add in the maple syrup, vanilla and coconut oil, process that a bit more until it is a smooth and creamy paste.
  3. Add in the remaining ingredients and process until smooth and creamy.

Whipped Coconut Cream:

  1. Make sure that your can of coconut milk is well chilled. I recommend leaving it in the fridge overnight. Open the can of coconut milk carefully, keeping it level. There will be a firm, waxy layer of coconut cream that solidified on top. Carefully scoop this off into a chilled glass bowl. Keep the leftover coconut water, it is great for smoothies.
  2. Using a mixer, whip the coconut cream for 3 to 5 minutes until it becomes light and fluffy, with soft peaks.
  3. Mix in your maple syrup and vanilla, if you are using.
  4. Place the whipped coconut cream back into the fridge until you are ready to use. This may be more than what you need for all 12 tarts, depending on how much you put on top, but that’s ok, it keeps for several days, covered in the fridge.

Assembling the Tarts:

    1. Remove the paper liner off of the tart shells. Top each of the tart shells with a spoonful of the pumpkin filling and a dollop of whipped coconut cream, sprinkle with a little ground cinnamon. Serve immediately.

Tasty Yummies

Full Recipe

 

 

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Organic Carrot and Chicken Soup

This has become a family favorite and I want to share it with you.
I started making this when we learned that our daughter had leaky gut syndrome. This was keeping her sick even after being gluten free for 2 years. The recipe I started with was the basis for the Specific Carbohydrate Diet.
I have made it so many times and customized it along the way. I’m sure you will appreciate the the final product.

Grocery list for wonderful soup:
6-8 skin on chicken thighs(depending on size)
1 lb chicken sausage(I use organic from Sunworks)
8-10 good size carrots(for the soup in the picture, I found thumbelina carrots for a change)
2-3 cups of chicken stock(I prefer to make my own)
1 1/2 yellow onion
1 handful of fresh cilantro
1 handful fresh parsley
Sea salt and ground pepper to taste

This soup is purposely sparse on spices, to aid in healing, but adjust it to your tastes.

Peel carrots and cut 3/4 into large pieces and the remaining carrots into bite sized pieces. (You will need to easily pull out larger ones so that you can blend them up.)

Cut onion into larger pieces.

In a large pot, place chicken, carrots, onion, cilantro, parsley and chicken stock. Salt and pepper to taste. Top with water and slow boil for 3 hours. While soup is boiling, brown chicken sausage and break into small pieces.

After 3 hours, the carrots are very soft(great for easy digestion). Separate the chicken and vegetables from the stock. If you have an immersion blender, then blend the large pieces of carrot and some of the onion to create a more cloudy soup. If you are blending in a blender or Vitamix, put vegetables and some stock into the blender and slowly blend until smooth and creamy. Pour into the stock and stir into a nice soup. Carefully remove all bones and skin from the chicken thighs.(I then use the skin and bones again to make chicken stock)

Cut chicken into small pieces and prepare to put back into the soup.  Add the browned chicken sausage at this time. You have a portion of carrots and onions to put back into the soup. Continue to simmer on low and season to taste.

This makes enough soup for a few days and it makes a great school lunch item. You can freeze the soup and if stored correctly, it will be good for quite some time. It usually doesn’t last that long though.

 

 

 

Coconut Milk Yogurt Review

Going dairy free, grain free a few years ago, I had tried to make coconut milk yogurt soon after making the switch. FAIL! I tried it twice and failed both times. Yucky grey mold. (insert blechk face!)I had given up and my Yogourmet sat silently on the shelf waiting for the next opportunity to give it another go. Thanks to Danielle Walker and her recipe, I felt confident enough to give it a go.

I tried another recipe that didn’t use gelatin when I failed and that may have been the difference for me. You will have to try it for yourself and see.

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Ingredients needed:

2-14 oz cans of coconut cream/milk

3 tbls unflavoured gelatin

2 tbls honey

1-50-billion IU probiotic capsule or 1 dairy free probiotic yogurt starter kit

  1. Place 1/4 cup of the coconut milk in a bowl. Sprinkle the gelatin over it and set aside to bloom for 10 minutes.photo 3
  2. Heat the remaining coconut milk in a saucepan over medium heat until it reaches 150 degrees F, about 10 minutes.photo 2 (2)
  3. Remove from heat and whisk in the softened gelatin and the honey until dissolved.
  4. Allow milk to cool to 110 degrees F, then whisk in the contents of 1-50 billion IU probiotic capsule or the yogurt starter.
  5. Pour the mixture through a  mesh sieve into sterilized jars and screw on the lids.
  6. Place the jars in a yogurt maker and ferment for 18-24 hours, or ferment in a dehydrator without the trays on 120 degrees F for the same time.photo 1 (3)
  7. The yogurt will still be liquid and the coconut cream may have separated at this point. Place the jars in the refridgerator for 4 hours to allow the gelatin to set and the yogurt to thicken. Once set, whisk vigorously to blend the yogurt or pulse in a blender a few times for an ultra-smooth consistency.

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Leaky Gut Syndrome In Plain English – And How To Fix It, by Jordan Reasoner

Three years ago the doctor gave our daughter a diagnosis of celiac disease and we thought our world was upside-down. Well, after all of the testing and appointments, he sent us home with a plan to not eat gluten. That meant to look at the labels and make sure that she wasn’t getting any wheat, barley or rye in our foods.

At that time we had a typical diet of pizzas, mac and cheese and all the “normal” boxed goodness meals. We are hard working parents, doing our best to raise our beautiful children and provide nutritious meals that our tasty and healthy.

With the celiac diagnosis, came the charge to find the same type of products, just gf, so that we could continue on our similar path. This message was echoed by other families that we talked to, with the same diagnosis. “Try to eat normal diet, just take out gluten”

Fast forward 2 years and our daughter is still not gaining weight and still not feeling good. Tummy pain started about 1 year into eating gf foods.

She was getting worse! Losing weight. After a lot of our own research and sleepless nights, we found SCD and what was possibly the closest symptoms to our daughter’s. At this point there wasn’t much that could get worse.

Thank you to http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info/, Jordan and Steve for going through this before and finding a solution. You have shared your stories of successes and failures.

http://www.breakingtheviciouscycle.info/p/scd-autism/

by JORDAN REASONER

Leaky Gut can be so confusing, but it’s becoming more and more of an epidemic.  Many of the causes and cures of Leaky Gut are widely debated, but Doctors are becoming more aware of the condition and ways to treat it.

This article is meant to shine some light on how to treat Leaky Gut Syndrome and why the SCD Diet is such a critical component to it.   

Leaky Gut Explained:

The term Leaky Gut Syndrome is used to describe the condition of “Hyperpermeable Intestines”.  A fancy medical term that means the intestinal lining has became more porous, with more holes developing that are larger in size and the screening out process is no longer functioning properly.  The fallout results in larger, undigested food molecules and other “bad stuff” (yeast, toxins, and all other forms of waste) that your body normally doesn’t allow through, to flow freely into your bloodstream.

So now that we have the general essentially meaningless definition out of the way let’s find out what is really going on…

The intestinal lining is the first mechanism of defense for our immune system.  The outer layers of intestinal cells (epithelial) are connected by structures called tight junctions.  At the tips of these cells are the microvilli, which absorb properly digested nutrients and transport them through the epithelial cell and into the bloodstream.  During normal digestion process the tight junctions stay closed, forcing all molecules to effectively be screened and only pass into the blood stream through the mucosa cells (think of them like bouncers at the front of a classy bar).  For reasons we will discuss later these tight junctions can become “open” or permeable allowing un-screened molecules to flow directly into the bloodstream (think of it like a fish net with very small holes).

Graphic From: www.leakygutcure.com

So Then What Happens?

The first reaction your body has to these “foreign” bodies in your blood is to fight like hell.  Initially, your Liver is called into action to work overtime and try to screen out all the particles that your intestinal lining was supposed to be taking care of.  In most cases, the liver has no chance of keeping up with the constant flow of waste into your blood and all the toxins, undigested food molecules, yeast, and other pathogens start to accumulate in your body.

Now the sleeping giant wakes up (your immune system) and it is not happy.  It goes into full battle mode to fight the evil intruders and get them out of the body ASAP.  More often than not, the body cannot keep up with the task at hand and the majority of these foreign bodies absorb into tissues throughout the body… causing them to inflame.

Inflammation is also an immune response and causes even more stress on your system.  Now that your body is focused on fighting the large war, the little battles are starting to be ignored, like filtering out the blood, calming inflamed areas of the body, fighting bacteria, regulating the gut, etc.  This process flow can lead to your body fighting itself and an array of autoimmune diseases such as Chronic Fatigue, MS, IBS, Ulcerative Colitis, and Fibromyalgia.

Now your body will begin to produce antibody soldiers designed to fight against these foreign objects (which can be things such as the Casein protein from the milk you’re drinking, or other proteins in nuts, grains, or eggs).  Even chemicals normally found in foods such as Phenols and Glycerin can now trigger immune responses when they enter the body.  For instance, I immediately react to diary of any kind.  I get instant brain fog, a headache, sore throat, and horrible sinus drainage.  A similar reaction happens when I eat foods high in phenols such as tomato juice.  I am confident that it is all part of a reaction as a result of years with leaky gut from my Celiac Disease.

If you are having any food sensitivities to more than a dozen foods, you likely have leaky gut.  Any undigested foods that are absorbed into the blood stream are now considered enemies of the state, and your immune system will develop reactions to many of them, leading to food intolerances.  When you have a Leaky Gut condition, the damaged microvilli along the intestinal lining cannot manufacture the digestive enzymes they need to break down the food for proper digestion.  The resulting condition allows food molecules to flow into the bloodstream that have not been completely broken down into the nutrients your body needs. 

Bottom Line: The foods that you’re eating are not the root of the problem; it’s the leaky gut letting the food molecules into your bloodstream.  Of course, the caveat is severe food allergies such as gluten to a Celiac or deadly peanut allergies.

How Do I Know If I Have Leaky Gut Syndrome?

Symptoms of Leaky Gut can vary from person to person depending on the level of damage and the tissues being affected.  Multiple Food Sensitivities can be a sign that your immune system is developing antibodies to everything you’re eating.  Nutritional deficiencies are a sign of lacking vitamins and minerals from the improper breakdown of food in your intestines.  Chronic diarrhea and constipation are signs of inflammation of the intestinal walls from Leaky Gut.  Skin rashes are your body’s way of trying to dump the toxins through the skin perforations.  A poor immune system will result from your body trying to wage war on itself and ignoring all the virus and bacteria we encounter on a daily basis, allowing you to get sick more often.  Headaches, brain fog, memory loss, and excessive fatigue are a result of the inflammation of tissue and toxin build up.  Yeast overgrowth (Candida) will cause cravings for sugar and carbs, gas, bloating, and anxiety.  All of these things add up to a host of symptoms with a myriad of explanations… all leading back to one thing: the constant river of foreign objects being allowed to enter your bloodstream.

What Causes Leaky Gut?

The cause of Leaky Gut is widely debated in the medical community.  However, there is some level of consensus that the following are the basic contributors:

–  Diet: Consuming high amounts of refined sugars, processed foods, preservatives, refined flours, and flavorings introduces massive amounts of chemicals into the body that is seen as toxic.  If your body has a hard time keeping up the toxins start to build up and cause inflammation (like we talked about earlier).

–  Chronic Stress: Chronic stress almost always results in a suppressed immune system.  A weakened immune system cannot handle doing it’s normal job and gets overrun with pathogens very quickly.  This increases overall gut inflammation leading to increased permeability of the intestinal lining.

–  Inflammation: Any type of inflammation in the gut can lead to leaky gut.  This can be brought on by low stomach acid (which passes undigested food into the small intestine irritating everything it passes by), yeast overgrowth (Candida), bacteria overgrowth, infection, parasites and excessive environmental toxins.

–  Medications: Any medication prescriptions or even over-the-counter pain relievers with Aspirin or Acetaminophen irritate the intestinal lining and decrease the mucosal levels (a membrane produces mucus on the intestinal lining as a natural protective measure).  This can start or help to continue the inflammation cycle (more bacteria, yeast, and digestion issues) and promotes an increase in permeability.

–  Yeast: Yeast is found in normal gut flora but as soon as it begins to get out of hand it mutates into a multi-celled fungus (usually Candida) that grows tentacles to grab onto the intestinal lining and stay put, consequently making its own holes in the lining.

–  Lack of Zinc: Zinc is a critical piece of maintaining a strong intestinal lining.  A deficiency of the vitamin can lead to the mucosal lining losing strength and becoming more permeable.  There are studies that show that supplementing with Zinc when it is deficient can dramatically improve intestinal lining integrity.

How To Fix Leaky Gut Syndrome…

The medical community is also still rather divided about the methods used to alleviate leaky gut.  Treating Leaky Gut is a multi-faceted approach that requires many different pieces of the puzzle to fall into place.  If each one is utilized, the holes in the sinking ship will plug up and allow the body to return to a more normal state.  Here are a few of the most agreed upon avenues and also where the SCD Diet comes into play:

– Diet Restrictions: Eliminating sugars, starches, grains, and any other irritating foods alleviates the inflammation and starves out the yeast overgrowth (this is where the SCD diet takes over the healing process).  Reducing both of these allows the intestinal tract to slowly return to its normal permeability, stopping the flow of foreign objects into the blood, which will stop food intolerance symptoms and eventually help stop the vicious cycle just as the book described it.  I would argue that the Specific Carbohydrate Diet is the foundation of curing leaky gut, but it does need some help from the next three pieces.

Here’s a free guide to get started on the Specific Carbohydrate Diet: “How To Start The SCD Diet In 24-Hours

  Nutritional Supplementing: The conditions that lead to leaky gut can also cause mal-absorption and improper digestion, both of which are going to leave you with nutritional deficiencies.  First and foremost: supplementing with a good multi-vitamin, large amounts of vitamin D, and Zinc will help the intestinal lining return to normal (assuming the irritants from the diet are removed by following the SCD diet).  Essential fish oils have also been shown to really help improve the condition of the intestinal mucosal lining (omega-3’s greatly reduce inflammation among a host of other benefits).

  Probiotics: Now that the Candida is being knocked down by your adherence to the SCD diet, mixing in a solid foundation of probiotics, and more specifically, the friendly bacteria Lactobacillus Acidophilus is a must.  The diet gets rid of the bad bacteria and you need a constant feed of the good bacteria to replace it.  Friendly bacteria stop the inhabitance of bad bacteria and yeast, heal the gut lining, help nutrients get absorbed, and keep the vicious cycle in check.  Studies suggest that keeping a ratio of 85% good to bad bacteria in the gut will stop the cycle from starting back up.  A good non-dairy SCD legal lactobacillus acidophilus will be very beneficial.

  Digestive Enzymes: Digestive enzymes are critical to properly breaking down the foods we eat.  They are found naturally in the raw form of foods to help break them down, unfortunately, in the beginning stages of the SCD diet we have to cook all of our fruits and veggies, rendering them useless for enzymes.  The have multi-faceted skills to help alleviate leaky gut.  First, plant based enzymes will break down food into very small particles before it leaves the stomach, preventing large undigested molecules from irritating the intestinal lining and increasing nutritional uptake.  They also work through your intestines acting as garbage collectors by removing toxins, bacteria, and damaged cells of the mucosal lining.  The whole process gives the gut a clean slate of healthy cells to rebuild with.  While the leaky gut permeability remains, they do the same garbage collecting in the bloodstream if they are passed through the intestinal lining.  The bromelain and papain enzymes are shown to reduce inflammation in the gut lining and throughout other tissues in the body, allowing the immune system and the liver some reprieve.    Any SCD legal, plant based enzyme will make a world of difference here.           

In good health,

– Jordan

Leaky Gut Syndrome in Plain English – and How to Fix It

The Gluten Free Lie: Why Celiacs Are Slowly Dying

For the one year anniversary of the beginning of my daughter’s recovery from “failure to thrive” and the doctors brilliant(sarcasm) prescription of Ensure, this article has brought us to a place of health and happiness! After numerous trips to emergency, the doctors really didn’t know what was going on. We were essentially left to figure out what was happening on our own.
She is now a shining example of a creative and goofy pre-teen.
When we read this article, it shattered our paradigm! We thought we were doing what we needed to, for her health. After reading and re-reading this many times, we then considered how we would then eat. The choice was obvious! We would change whatever we needed to, to get healthy and happy. (She was in pain and unhappy. It didn’t help that we were totally stressed)

We promised her,(through her tears)that we would do everything that we could to get her healthy and pain-free. Once we started SCD, we saw slow but steady improvement in her mood and her health. It was inconvenient and restrictive, but all in the effort to get her well, right!

This article may not be what you want to hear, but for some, they still may be frustrated like we were and unsure of what to do next. I hope that re-posting this may help other families reach a point where they can feel healthy again.

By Jordan Reasoner

Conventional medicine usually works like this…

I have a problem, the doctor figures out what the problem is, and gives me a conventional prescription generally supported by Doctors, researchers, and the FDA.

This prescription is supposed to be relatively safe and effective in accordance with the laws in the United States and most modern countries

But what if the conventional prescription doesn’t work?

Like people with Celiac Disease that follow a strict gluten-free diet and don’t get better…

Does that mean the gluten-free diet is the wrong prescription for Celiac Disease?

Earlier in this series, I showed you that gluten is toxic invader that causes Celiac Disease. Logically, removing the intruder is the first step towards treatment. That’s why anyone diagnosed with this autoimmune condition gets the conventional Celiac Disease prescription: follow a strict gluten-free diet for life. But the latest Celiac Disease research is painting a very different picture.

The University of Chicago has one of the leading treatment and research centers for Celiac Disease in the U.S., so my jaw dropped when they posted this:

“While healing may take up to 2 years for many older adults, new research shows that the small intestines of up to 60% of adults never completely heal, especially when adherence to the diet is less than optimal.”[1].

60% odds are worse than flipping a coin…

It would be easy to read that and think, “So it’s the people who don’t follow a strict gluten-free diet that don’t heal.” But to be honest, I don’t think they said it as strongly as they should have. Here’s a recent study that paints a much darker picture of the gluten-free diet’s success rate.

Only 8% of adult patients healed on a gluten-free diet…

A 2009 study in The Journal of Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics looked at 465 Celiac Disease patients and found only 8% of adult patients reached “histological normalization” after following a gluten-free diet for 16-months, meaning their gut tissue completely recovered to that of a healthy person. The authors stated:

“Complete normalization of duodenal lesions is exceptionally rare in adult coeliac patients despite adherence to GFD” [2]

These people followed a strict gluten-free diet for 16-months and most didn’t heal their gut. The success rate of the conventional Celiac Disease prescription isn’t working… and the research is exploding the truth.

Another 2010 study in the American Journal of Gastroenterology looked at 381 adults with biopsy-proven Celiac Disease. The authors found small intestine mucosal recovery occurred in only 34% of participants following a Gluten-Free diet for 2-years. They concluded:

“Mucosal recovery was absent in a substantial portion of adults with CD after treatment with a GFD.”[3]

The Conventional Merck Manual definition for diagnosing Celiac Disease provides that: “The diagnosis is confirmed by an initial microscopic examination of a biopsy specimen revealing flattened villi of the small intestine and by a subsequent improvement in the lining after the person stops eating foods containing gluten.”

These studies clearly show that when a Celiac stops eating foods containing gluten, the intestinal lining isn’t healing. But that’s only scratching the surface of what’s going on…

65% of gluten-free Celiacs still have a raging fire in their gut

The same 2009 study in The Journal of Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics of 465 Celiac Disease patients 16-months gluten-free found that 65% still had “persistent intraepithelial lymphocytosis” AKA inflammation in the gut.[4]

Their intestines are on fire with inflammation even after 16-months gluten-free.  Why is that important?

We know gut inflammation is associated with a laundry list of health issues, including cancer and early death.  That’s bad news for the conventional Celiac prescription and even worse news for the people not getting better on a gluten-free diet.  Want more evidence gluten-free doesn’t put the fire out?

A 2008 study in the Journal of Inflammation looked at 18 symptom-free Celiac Disease (SFCD) patients and found they still had elevated markers of gut inflammation even after 2 years on a gluten-free diet.  The authors reported:

“Faeces of both active CD and SFCD (symptom-free 1-2 years on a GFD) patients, representing an imbalanced microbiota, significantly increased TNF-alpha production and CD86 expression in PBMCs, while decreased IL-10 cytokine production and CD4 expression compared with control samples.” [5]

In another 2009 study from the American Journal of Gastroenterology, researchers looked at small intestine biopsies from 45 children with Celiac Disease and 18 clinical controls.  The authors found an increased presence of T cells (inflammatory marker) in well-treated CD patients:

“The long-lasting presence of high frequencies of T cells in the epithelial compartment in well-treated CD indicates that the epithelium is stressed possibly because of constant attack.”[6]

Both these studies looked at patients that are supposed to be “healed”… supposedly “well-treated”. Even though they appeared to be symptom-free, the medical tests paint a much different picture.  These asymptomatic adults and kids still had inflammatory fires raging in their gut… promoting further disease development (like Cancer).

So far this research has only reviewed patients following a gluten-free diet for 1-2 years… but what about long term?  Does the body just need more time to heal and get back to normal?

56% have poor vitamin status after 10 years gluten-free

A 2002 study in the of Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics looked at the vitamin status of 30 adults with Celiac Disease showing “biopsy-proven remission,” after following a gluten-free diet for 8-12 years.  They found that 56% had poor vitamin status, suggesting that proper nutrient uptake is not occurring. The authors concluded that:

“It is generally assumed that coeliac patients adhering to a strict gluten-free diet for years will consume a diet that is nutritionally adequate.  This is supported by the demonstration of a normal bone mineral density up to 10 years of dietary treatment.  Our results may indicate otherwise. We found signs indicative of a poor vitamin status in 56% of treated adult coeliac patients.” [7]

Even after following the conventional Celiac prescription for 10 years 56% still showed signs of poor nutrient uptake, meaning their digestive system still isn’t working like it’s designed to.

That means after 10 years of being gluten-free, HALF of all Celaics are likely starving for the critical nutrients required for health and longevity.  It’s no wonder we have a 77X increased risk for lymphoma.[8]

The gluten-free diet doesn’t fix leaky gut

Earlier in this series, we discovered that gliadin initiates leaky gut by increasing the zonulin protein in people with Celiac Disease.   And later, we learned that fixing leaky gut is absolutely essential to reversing the damage from Celiac Disease…

But the gluten-free diet doesn’t fix leaky gut…

As it turns out, when Celiac Disease patients follow a strict gluten-free diet, their zonulin levels do fall (which is good).  But research shows that they still have elevated levels of zonulin compared to non-Celiacs.  And when the zonulin levels are still high… the Tight Junctions can’t restore normal function and the leaky gut remains.

Chris Masterjohn found the same thing reviewing a study by researcher Allessio Fasano,[9]

 Remarkably, they found that celiacs produce 30 times as much zonulin as non-celiacs, even though the non-celiacs were not eating gluten-free diets while the celiacs had been off gluten for over two years!

Here’s a graph of their data:

 

This is remarkable because even though the point of the study was to show that gluten increases zonulin production, the controls were eating gluten yet had infinitesimal levels of zonulin production, while the celiacs had not eaten gluten for at least two years yet still had very high levels of zonulin production.  This suggests that something besides gluten may be causing zonulin production in celiacs.

 

Chris also pointed out the same study looked at Leaky Gut in Celiac Disease patients following a gluten-free diet for more than two-years:

[NOTE: in the graph below, the smaller the bar, the leakier the gut is]

Here they measured trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of intestinal tissue taken from gluten-free celiacs and gluten-eating controls.  TEER is an estimation of the leakiness of the gut, where a lower value indicates a greater level of leakiness or permeability.  They found that tissues taken from controls who had been eating gluten had three-fold less leakiness compared to celiacs who had been off gluten for over two years.  This, again, suggests that something besides gluten may be contributing to leaky gut in people with celiac.

So in summary, Chris pointed out:

  • Celiacs produce 30 times as much zonulin as non-celiacs, even though the celiacs had been off gluten for over two years!
  • Intestinal tissues taken from controls who had been eating gluten had three-fold less leakiness compared to Celiacs who had been off gluten for over two years (so Celiacs had a much leakier gut, even while eating gluten-free)

But the evidence doesn’t stop there…

A 2008 study in the Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research tested for leaky gut in 22 celiac disease patients who were on a gluten-free diet for 1 year.  They found these patients following a gluten-free diet still had a much leakier gut compared to healthy controls eating gluten (0.013 vs 0.003, P = 0.001).  The authors concluded:

“This means that, at some time, complete recovery of intestinal villous may not have occurred and an inflammatory process may have persisted.”[10]

This is crazy!  All this research shows the gluten-free diet doesn’t heal Celiac Disease.  In fact, the evidence suggests that in many cases, leaky gut and inflammation remain high for years on a gluten-free diet.  This spells bad news for anyone with Celiac Disease relying on a gluten-free diet as the only treatment protocol…

It breaks down like this… high inflammation, poor vitamin status, and leaky gut persist on a gluten-free diet which leads to one thing: untreated Celiac Disease…

And untreated Celiac Disease will kill you… fast

If you don’t completely heal from Celiac Disease, you’re going to die much sooner than healthy people.  In fact, one of the largest cohort studies on Celiac Disease patients and mortality published in the Journal of The American Medical Association found that:

  • Those with Celiac Disease (villous atrophy) had a 2.80-fold increased risk of death the first year after diagnosis and a 39% increased risk of death over the study period

But the authors didn’t stop there… they also looked at people with intestinal inflammation.  Remember the two studies on “well-treated” (asymptomatic) patients that still had inflammation?  The authors found:

  • Those with intestinal inflammation (and not villous atrophy) had a 4.66-fold increased risk of death the first year after diagnosis and a 72% increased risk of death over the study period[11]

A 72% increased risk of death!

In other words, if you’re a symptom-free Celiac and your labs show signs of gut inflammation… you’re going to die much sooner than you think. 

So should Celiacs eat a gluten-free diet?

Yes… gluten is still the kryptonite in Celiac Disease, don’t ever eat it.  Following a gluten-free diet is a requirement for treating this autoimmune condition… but you can’t stop there.

This evidence clearly shows that only following a gluten-free diet doesn’t fix leaky gut, gut inflammation, or a damaged gut lining.  That means the gluten-free diet isn’t enough to treat Celiac Disease patients and anyone using it as the only protocol is at risk for dying much sooner than they should…

The conventional Celiac prescription is incomplete and not working.  There needs to be more. 

In the last post, I showed you that fixing leaky gut is a critical step in reversing Celiac Disease… and now you know that gluten-free doesn’t cut it.  In the next part of this series, I’ll explore the leaky gut-Celiac connection and what to do about it.

http://scdlifestyle.com/2012/03/the-gluten-free-lie-why-most-celiacs-are-slowly-dying/

SCD, Paleo, gluten free, Butternut Squash Mac n’ Cheese

I’m so excited to find this recipe and to have it come from Jordan Reasoner is that much better! I am looking forward to trying it for my kids. I will update with a comment on how it goes. Stay healthy!

Pic of Angela's Butternut Squash "Mac n' Cheese" in a bowl

Butternut Squash Mac n’ Cheese

By: Jordan Reasoner

 

Sometimes my 5-year old son comes home from school asking to “eat the food the other kids have.”  So I do my best to improvise, like the time I made him Apple Sandwiches.

Sometimes the other kids have Mac n’ Cheese and he’s asked about it, but I didn’t have any ideas for him then.  Mostly because I don’t tolerate dairy and eating classic Mac n’ Cheese is partly why I got sick in the first place ha-ha.

But a dairy-free version that still tastes good?  That’s an interesting idea…

That’s why I’m happy to have our friend Angela from Paleokitchenlab.com back to share another cool recipe, this time for Butternut Squash Mac n’ Cheese (including a dairy-free version).  Granted the dairy-free version isn’t quite the same… but it’s still a cool recipe that I can eat.

Woohoo!  I’ll be testing this out with my kids very soon 🙂

[Enter Angela]

Pic of butternut squash cubed

Ingredients:

  • 1 16-oz. Bag of Broccoli Slaw (Can make by shredding broccoli stalks or buy them pre-cut, or use kelp noodles or spaghetti squash)
  • Pancetta (Italian Bacon) or Regular Bacon
  • 1 Tsp of Sea Salt, Cumin and Paprika
  • 2 Cups of Cooked Butternut Squash Flesh or Raw Butternut Squash Cubes (available pre-sliced at grocery stores)
  • 1 Cup of Beef Bone Broth or Chicken Broth (Click Here for Steve and Jordan’s Recipe)
  • 1 Red Onion, Cubed
Pic of Angela's Butternut Squash "Mac n' Cheese" close-up

Directions:

  • Cook the butternut squash in broth and add in spices (you can use other types of squash like delicata or kabocha if you like a sweeter flavor).  If squash is raw, then cook till soft and broth evaporates.  If squash is cooked, then use less broth and let it cook down till it forms a pasty consistency.
  • Bake the broccoli slaw in the oven, tossed in olive oil (or if you tolerate dairy, use melted butter or ghee)
  • Bake at 350°F for 30 minutes (or until broccoli slaw is soft)
  • In a pan, sauté red onion and pancetta (or bacon) in cooking fat of choice (you don’t need too much because bacon is naturally fatty)
  • Add bacon/onion mixture to the butternut squash sauce and mix in
  • Pour hot sauce over broccoli slaw

Note:  If you tolerate dairy, give it that cheesy flavor by adding a tablespoon of butter or ghee, a little bit of nutritional yeast or grated cheese.  But it’s quite tasty without it.

Enjoy this nutritious spin on a classic American dish.

P.S.  Let us know what you think in the blog comments here: http://scdlifestyle.com/2014/03/butternut-squash-mac-n-cheese

 

6 more reasons to stop eating corn

I found another great article from Dr. Osborne. He usually has a good perspective on health and gluten-free.
After 2 years on the “gluten-free” diet, our daughter was still not doing well and we ended up going completely grain free and doing  SCD. It has been almost 1 year since making those big changes, but she is healthy and that makes us all happy. Dr Osborne and his articles were very helpful in making the discovery about gluten in other grains like corn.
Dr. Osborne here,

Everyone going gluten always wants to replace breads, pastas, and cereals with corn-based substitutes.  Here are 6 reasons why doing this will keep you from getting healthy <<<

Great book for SCD, paleo or celiacs!

I have been using some of Danielle Walker’s recipes as they are awesome, but I thought that getting from the internet was the way to go. Well, my wife knows how much I LOVE her recipes(and she’s not hard to look at either), so she bought the recipe book for me. It is so good and a beautiful addition to my collection of “must haves”.

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Since getting the book, I have tried and made some great things. I made mayonnaise, hamburgers, “peanut butter” cookies and the best club sandwich! If you are SCD or Celiac or just wanting to eat healthy, you will love her easy and down to earth approach to food.
Thank you Danielle. You have helped to make our lives so much better.

DANIELLE WALKER, SCD/Paleo bread recipe

Thank you to Againstallgrain.com, I have found the best,so far, SCD/gluten free bread recipe.
I tried it today and the recipe is pretty easy. I have found that if you forget most of what you knew about cooking with regular flour and just “go with it”, you will have less stress and better success. Enjoy the process:)
This is what mine came out like.
photo (14)


GRAIN-FREE SANDWICH BREAD(paleo and SCD)
Grain-Free Paleo Bread
Here’s the moment you have all been waiting patiently (and some not so patiently!) for. And because I ♥ my readers, I’m giving it to you a week earlier than planned: Grain-free, yeast-free, dairy-free sandwich bread. It’s moist on the inside with a slight crust on the outside, has an amazing texture and taste when toasted, and can also be used straight from the fridge with some almond butter and jam.

To achieve the moist white bread texture that you often miss with the use of almond flour or almond butter, I used raw organic cashew butter and beat the egg whites separately. Obviously, baking grain-free is much pricier than regular baking, but you can make a loaf of this bread for about $8.50. If you don’t care about using all organic products, you can make it for even cheaper by making your own cashew butter. The price you pay for health!
We’ve been having a bit of bread overload in our house lately. I’ve made this loaf about 10 times now, changing tidbits here and there until I had it perfected and ready to share with you. Of course, we had to try it out with all of our former beloved bread recipes like paninis, french toast, and fried egg sandwiches first. I also plan to make an egg strada with this and probably even a bread pudding. But most of all, we just like to eat a slice toasted with homemade blueberry jam in the morning with our eggs.
Grain-Free Paleo Bread

againstallgrainbread

Author: Danielle Walker – Against All Grain
Recipe type: Breads and Baked Goods
Serves: makes 1 8.5×4.5 loaf
Ingredients
1 cup smooth raw cashew butter at room temperature (I use Artisana Organic)
4 large eggs, separated (mine weighed about 9 ounces in their shells)
½ to 2 tablespoons honey (use 2tbl if you plan to use if for sweeter dishes like french toast)
2.5 teaspoons apple cider vinegar
¼ cup almond milk
¼ cup coconut flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon sea salt
Instructions
Preheat your oven to 300 degrees. For a white colored loaf as in the photo, place a small dish of water on the bottom rack.
Line the bottom of an 8.5×4.5 glass loaf pan with parchment paper, then spread a very thin coating of coconut oil on the sides of the pan.
Beat the cashew butter with the egg yolks, then add the honey, vinegar, and milk. I’ve done this with both electric hand beaters and a stand mixer and both seem to work equally as well. I would not try to make this by hand due to the stickiness of the butter.
Beat the egg whites in a separate bowl until peaks form. I used an electric hand mixer, but if you want a bicep workout, you can also do it by hand.
Combine the dry ingredients in another small bowl. Sorry for all of the dishes!
Make sure your oven is completely preheated before adding the egg whites and the dry ingredients to the cashew butter mixture. You don’t want your whites to fall, and the baking soda will activate once it hits the eggs and vinegar.
Pour the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients, and beat until combined. This will result in more of a wet batter than a dough. Make sure to get all of the sticky butter mixture off of the bottom of the bowl so you don’t end up with clumps.
Pour the beaten egg whites into the cashew butter mixture, beating again until just combined. You don’t have to be gentle with this, but don’t over mix.
Pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan, then immediately put it into the oven.
Bake for 45-50 minutes, until the top is golden brown and a toothpick comes out clean. Don’t be tempted to open the oven door anytime before 40 minutes, as this will allow the steam to escape and you will not get a properly risen loaf.
Remove from the oven, then let cool for 15-20 minutes. Use a knife to free the sides from the loaf pan, then flip it upside down and release the loaf onto a cooling rack. Cool right-side up for an hour before serving.
Wrap the loaf up tightly and store in the fridge for 1 week. I actually think the loaf gets better as the days go on.