Tag Archives: gluten

Pain Must Mean Glutening, Right??

If you are eating gluten free food and being very careful, you are safe and keeping healthy right?

Not necessarily so!

I know this may come as a shock and many of you reading this, might not want to hear it.

Many celiac people have no outward symptoms! They are only safe as long as there is NO gluten whatsoever.  So you may be one of those people and you may not realize that your small intestine is being damaged when you are eating at a restaurant or having something with only a little gluten in it.

Here are some quotes and some links that may shed some more light on this issue.

One of the important conclusions made by the research group is that the possibility of celiac disease should be strongly considered in people with other autoimmune disorders, even if those people do not show gastrointestinal symptoms traditionally associated with celiac disease.

http://www.celiac.com/articles/21533/1/Most-People-Diagnosed-With-Celiac-Disease-Show-No-Symptoms/Page1.html

People with celiac disease may have no symptoms but can still develop complications of the disease over time. Long-term complications include malnutrition—which can lead to anemia, osteoporosis, and miscarriage, among other problems—liver diseases, and cancers of the intestine.

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/

Why Go Gluten-Free If Your Celiac Is Silent?

It can be tough to go and stay gluten-free if you don’t notice gastrointestinal symptoms from your condition. There’s no doubt that eating gluten-free can be complicated and difficult, andcheating on the gluten-free diet is pretty tempting if you don’t suffer from symptoms.

However, there are two reasons to stay gluten-free even if you don’t notice major symptoms from gluten ingestion.

The first is to safeguard your long-term health. Cheating on the diet can cause some pretty significant health problems, including malnutritioninfertilityosteoporosis and potentially even certain cancers.

Even cheating once or twice a month can prevent your intestines from healing and perpetuate the immune system response, so eating gluten occasionally is almost as bad as eating it constantly.

intestines

http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/symptomsofceliacdisease/a/Silent-Celiac-Disease.htm

I know for many people, it is not popular and it was the same for us when the diagnosis came in. We were less than excited about not being able to eat at restaurants or have family get togethers, the way we used to.

For the first year or so I worked very hard at finding workable solutions for celiac’s to be able to dine out and find convenient ways to get fed. What I realized is that it is not worth the risk. Eating something from a restaurant or from a kind family member is not worth the long term risks, if you are not 100% sure.

If you knew that you could do something to prevent an auto-immune disease like MS or arthritis in the future, wouldn’t it be worth it?

Curtis family 090 re

I think the answer is easily yes.

5 Things You Should Know Before Going Gluten Free

When I read this article for the first time, I thought about my daughter who was diagnosed when she was 7. She has been so brave and so mature through all of what she(and the family)have gone through. She continues to amaze me and my wife. She is an inspiration to many of us, who might occasionally say “oh I can’t do possibly do that!”
 
“You may not realize it when it happens, but a kick in the teeth may be the best thing in the world for you.” Walt Disney

Our children will be so much better equipped, to deal with our food challenges that we face today. Gluten and grains will be better understood and it will be normal for people with celiac disease to dine out in safe environments and join in, in social gatherings like there is nothing special about them. 
 
The children growing up, like my children, don’t know any different. As the number of people with the diagnosis continues to climb, the level of understanding and acceptance will continue to grow as well. We will find better solutions for our health crisis here in North America and it will come in the fashion of small farms, people looking for local growers and more homemade simple meals.
 
I hope that by sharing our thoughts, challenges, triumphs and successes, that we can help clear a path for our children to make our world just a bit better.

Article courtesy: Taylor, Gluten Away

Everyone takes on going gluten-free in their own way. Some people research it first and take it on like a pro. Others get overwhelmed and don’t really know what to do. I’ve gained a lot of experience over the last 4 years, learned a lot of things, and also gotten a lot advice from people as well. Even though I’m 16 years old, I can definitely say I’m a pro by now. Even though I’m very experienced, there’s a lot of things I wish I knew when I first went went gluten-free 4 years ago. That’s why I put together this list of 5 things that everyone should know before they go gluten-free. I hope this is helpful to you no matter how experienced you are!

1. You NEED vitamins – Everyone who goes gluten-free thinks that they can just remove gluten and feel better. Although going gluten-free helps with celiac disease, a gluten intolerance, or just your overall health, it can also create a lot of issues. You are removing grains and a lot of food groups from your diet which means a lot of vitamins are being removed as well. Make sure you get the proper vitamins to replace what you are missing or you will get deficient in many vitamins and begin to feel sick. Click here for the most common vitamin deficiencies while being gluten-free!

2. Hidden gluten – It’s easy to know what gluten is in. Bread, pasta, cookies, cake and so on. But a lot of people don’t think about the hidden gluten which can be hard to find. Things like soy sauce and many other products make it very hard for people to know what to avoid. Also it’s important to look at whether a product is made in a facility containing wheat because this can cause cross contamination as well. Check out this Top Products With Hidden Gluten List!

3. You may need to remove more than gluten – Some people assume gluten is all they need to remove to feel better. This may be true for some but it isn’t true 100% of the time. Many people with celiac disease also have lactose intolerance since the 2 are connected. It’s important to get tested by a nutritionist to see if you are allergic to any other foods and if anything else should be removed from your diet. If you still continue to feel bad then it may be more than gluten that you have to avoid.

4. Social situations will be harder – I’ll say it right now because it’s true. Going gluten-free does make social situations harder. Most people only think about the diet aspect of going gluten-free but not the social aspect as well. Food is involved in almost any social get together which means it can be a lot harder to have options eating out. Let the people know you can’t have gluten or bring your own food! Either way going gluten-free is a life style change and this is one unfortunate side to it.

5. You can still enjoy food, being gluten-free – I’ve seen people say this a lot. They assume that going gluten-free means they can never enjoy food again which isn’t true at all. In fact, I think going gluten-free allows you to enjoy food more! Luckily there are gluten-free alternatives to pretty much anything now which is awesome. But there are actually so many naturally gluten-free options to enjoy besides those gluten-free alternatives. You can still enjoy food as long as you are open minded and realize there are still so many options for you to enjoy.

 

http://www.gfreefoodie.com/5-things-you-should-know-before-going-gluten-free-taylor-teenager-on-a-gluten-free-mission/

Why You Should Probably Stop Eating Wheat

Wheat and grain-based foods are all around us. We love our bagels, pasta, bread, and breakfast cereals. For many, the thought of eliminating these staples from our diets seems wholly unreasonable, if not ludicrous. But a growing number of people are switching to wheat-free diets — and for very good reason. As science is increasingly showing, eating wheat increases the potential for a surprising number of health problems. Here’s why you should probably stop eating wheat.

Without a doubt, wheat plays a major role in our diets. It supplies about 20% of the total food calories worldwide, and is a national staple in most countries.

But as is well known, some people, like those with celiac disease, need to stay away from it. The problem is that their small intestine is unable to properly digest gluten, a protein that’s found in grains. But wheat is being increasingly blamed for the onset of other health conditions, like obesity, heart disease, and a host of digestive problems — including the dramatic rise in celiac-like disorders.

So what’s going on? And why is everybody suddenly blaming wheat?

The answer, it appears, has to do with a whole lot of nastiness thats present in grain-based foods. Wheat raises blood sugar levels, causes immunoreactive problems, inhibits the absorption of important minerals, and aggravates our intestines.

And much of this may stem from the fact that wheat simply ain’t what it used to be.

Hybridized wheat

Indeed, today’s wheat is a far cry from what it was 50 years ago.

Why you should probably stop eating wheat

Back in the 1950s, scientists began cross-breeding wheat to make it hardier, shorter, and better-growing. This work, which was the basis for the Green Revolution — and one that won U.S. plant scientist Norman Borlaug the Nobel Prize — introduced some compounds to wheat that aren’t entirely human friendly.

As cardiologist Dr. William Davis noted in his book, Wheat Belly: Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight and Find Your Path Back to Health, today’s hybridized wheat contains sodium azide, a known toxin. It also goes through a gamma irradiation process during manufacturing.

But as Davis also points out, today’s hybridized wheat contains novel proteins that aren’t typically found in either the parent or the plant — some of which are difficult for us to properly digest. Consequently, some scientists now suspect that the gluten and other compounds found in today’s modern wheat is what’s responsible for the rising prevalence of celiac disease, “gluten sensitivity,” and other problems.

Gluten and Gliadin

No doubt, gluten is a growing concern — and it’s starting to have a serious impact on our health, and as a result, our dietary choices.

Gluten is a protein composite of gliadin and glutenin that appears in wheat as well as other grains like rye, barley, and spelt. It’s also what gives certain foods that wonderful, chewy texture. Gluten also helps dough to rise and keep its shape.

Why you should probably stop eating wheat

The problem, however, is in how it’s metabolized. According to Alessio Fasano, the Medical Director for The University of Maryland’s Center for Celiac Research, no one can properly digest gluten.

“We do not have the enzymes to break it down,” he said in a recent interview withTenderFoodie. “It all depends upon how well our intestinal walls close after we ingest it and how our immune system reacts to it.” His concern is that the gluten protein, which is abundant in the endosperm of barley, rye, and wheat kernels, is setting off an aberrant immune response.

Specifically, the gliadin and glutenin are acting as immunogenic anti-nutrients. Unlike fruits, which are meant to be eaten, grains have a way of fighting back. They create an immunogenic response which increases intestinal permeability, thus triggering systemic inflammation by the immune system — what can lead to any number of autoimmune diseases, including celiac, rheumatoid arthritis, irritable bowel syndrome, and so on. And this holds true for people who don’t have celiac disease.

Davis also believes that gliadin degrades to a morphine-like compound after eating, what creates an appetite for more wheat; his claim, therefore, is that wheat actually has an addictive quality to it.

Gliadin, what scientists call the “toxic fraction of gluten,” has also been implicated in gut permeability. When someone has an adverse reaction, it’s because gliadin cross talks with our cells — what causes confusion and a leak in the small intestines. Fasano explains:

Why you should probably stop eating wheat

Gliadin is a strange protein that our enzymes can’t break down from the amino acids (glutamine and proline) into elements small enough for us to digest. Our enzymes can only break down the gliadin into peptides. Peptides are too large to be absorbed properly through the small intestine. Our intestinal walls or gates, then, have to separate in order to let the larger peptide through. The immune system sees the peptide as an enemy and begins to attack.

The difference is that in a normal person, the intestinal walls close back up, the small intestine becomes normal again, and the peptides remain in the intestinal tract and are simply excreted before the immune system notices them. In a person who reacts to gluten, the walls stay open as long as you are consuming gluten. How your body reacts (with a gluten sensitivity, wheat allergy or Celiac Disease) depends upon how long the gates stay open, the number of “enemies” let through and the number of soldiers that our immune system sends to defend our bodies. For someone with Celiac Disease, the soldiers get confused and start shooting at the intestinal walls.

The effects of gluten and gliadin clearly vary from person to person. But as a recent studyshowed, nearly 1.8 million Americans have celiac disease, and another 1.4 million are likely undiagnosed. And surprisingly, another 1.6 million have adopted a gluten-free diet despite having no diagnosis.

In addition, it’s estimated that about 18 million Americans have “non-celiac gluten sensitivity,” which results in cramps and diarrhea.

High glycemic index

Wheat also raises blood sugar. As Davis notes, the glycemic index of wheat is very high (check out this chart from Harvard to see how various foods rank). It contains amylopectin A, which is more efficiently converted to blood sugar than just about any other carbohydrate, including table sugar.

Why you should probably stop eating wheat

Consequently, two slices of whole wheat bread increases blood sugar levels higher than a single candy bar. Overdoing the wheat, says Davis, can result in “deep visceral fat.”

Wheat can also trigger effects that aren’t immediately noticeable. Small low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles form after eating lots of carbohydrates — which are responsible for atherosclerotic plaque, which in turn can trigger heart disease and stroke. And in fact, it has been shown that a wheat-free diet can improve glucose tolerance in individuals with ischaemic heart disease.

Lectins

Lectins, which are a class of molecules, can be found in beans, cereal grains, nuts, and potatoes. And when consumed in excess, or when not cooked properly, they can be harmful.

Now, most lectins are actually quite benign, and in some cases they can even be therapeutic —like fighting some forms of HIV.

But the problem with some lectins, like the ones found in whole grains, is that they bind to our insulin receptors and intestinal lining. This increases inflammation and contributes to autoimmune disease and insulin resistance. It also facilitates the symptoms of metabolic syndrome outside of obesity.

Phytic acid

Phytates are also a problem, a compound that’s found within the hulls of nuts, seeds, and grains. Phytic acid cannot be digested by humans. And worse, it binds to metal ions like calcium, magnesium, zinc, and iron. In turn, these minerals cannot be properly absorbed after eating.

Consequently, any minerals that might be provided by consuming grain-based foods are not well metabolized. So phytates, combined with gluten, make it difficult for the body to absorb nutrients — which can lead to anemia and osteoporosis.

The Fiber myth

Lastly, a common argument in favor of continuing to eat whole grains is that they provide necessary fiber. This is actually a bit of a myth. As nutrition expert Mark Sisson has noted, “Apart from maintaining social conventions in certain situations and obtaining cheap sugar calories, there is absolutely no reason to eat grains.”

And indeed, we can get adequate amounts of insoluble fiber simply by eating plenty of fruits and vegetables.

Images: Top Morgan Lane Photography/Shutterstock. Inset: Zeljko Radojko/Shutterstock, JulijaSapic_Portfolio/Shutterstock, MedicineBulletin.

Question: Are mushrooms gluten-free?

Answer:

Plain mushrooms ought to be gluten-free — after all, they’re a fresh vegetable, right? But unfortunately, that’s not the end of the story for mushrooms if you’re particularly sensitive to trace gluten.

You see, mushroom spores are grown on gluten grains — most commonly on rye, but also on wheat and occasionally on a combination of the two grains. And this cultivation method leads to some gluten cross-contamination on the finished fungi.

How much gluten? It’s tricky to say, although it almost certainly comes in far lower than the less than 20 parts per million standard that’s considered “gluten-free” in the United States and some other countries.

However, it’s also enough to cause reactions in those of us with celiac disease and gluten sensitivitywho are quite sensitive.

More on sensitivity levels:

But Won’t Washing Get Rid of the Gluten?

Okay, so mushrooms are grown on gluten grains, which does sound a little scary. But you’d think washing your mushrooms well would get rid of any stray gluten-containing growing medium.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to do the job. Washing works for the less sensitive (who might not react to unwashed mushrooms, either). But for those who are sensitive to lower levels of gluten, washing really doesn’t seem to help enough to prevent a reaction.

I speak from experience on this: I definitely react (although not badly) to conventionally grown mushrooms, including Portabella mushrooms and the button mushrooms you buy at the grocery store. And yes, they’ve been washed. When I can source wild mushrooms (a woman at my local farm market sold them for a while), I have no trouble eating mushrooms.

Is this something you need to worry about? Very likely not, unless you react to mushrooms yourself or if you want to eliminate every possible gluten exposure, regardless of whether you react. Most people consume mushrooms just fine.

But if you repeatedly find yourself glutened following a meal that features mushrooms, then you may want to look around for a source of wild mushrooms. Here’s a list from About.com’s Guide to Gourmet Food: Where To Buy Wild Mushrooms. If you ask around at your local farm markets, you may also have success in finding someone who grows mushrooms on sorghum or millet, two gluten-free grains that occasionally are used to cultivate mushrooms.

http://celiacdisease.about.com/od/glutenfreefoodshopping/f/Gluten-Free-Mushrooms.htm

6 more reasons to stop eating corn

I found another great article from Dr. Osborne. He usually has a good perspective on health and gluten-free.
After 2 years on the “gluten-free” diet, our daughter was still not doing well and we ended up going completely grain free and doing  SCD. It has been almost 1 year since making those big changes, but she is healthy and that makes us all happy. Dr Osborne and his articles were very helpful in making the discovery about gluten in other grains like corn.
Dr. Osborne here,

Everyone going gluten always wants to replace breads, pastas, and cereals with corn-based substitutes.  Here are 6 reasons why doing this will keep you from getting healthy <<<

Neurological Effects of Gluten

Whether you have true Celiac Disease, or whether you “only” have lesser gluten antibodies and intolerances, gluten can cause multiple neurological issues. Depression, anxiety, sleep disorders, and a wide variety of Neuromuscular Disorders can have their roots in gluten antibody side effects.I have seen improvements in ALS, MS, CIPD, Tourette’s, seizures, and other complicated illnesses when the client goes strictly grain-free. Testing from Cyrex Labs is helpful in any Neurological or health disorder, as their tests for gluten cross-reactivity will pick up antibodies to dairy, quinoa, rice, oats and many others. (They have several other tests I run on myself and clients too).

In celiac disease, the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks a variety of proteins found in wheat, rye, and barley. In its attack on gluten, gliadin, gluteo-morphins and others, the immune system damages the small intestine and produces gut symptoms from mild to severe. Once damaged, the small intestine will not absorb vitamins, minerals, and proteins properly, and the immune system and neurotransmitters will be negatively affected. As a result of this malabsorption, we may find anemia, anorexia, arthritis, behavioral problems, autism spectrum disorders, infertility, pain, depression, migraines, numbness and tingling, bone loss, seizures, and more.

As for depression, a 1998 study confirmed that about one-third of those with celiac disease suffer from depression. Adolescents with celiac disease have a 31% risk of depression, while only 7% of healthy adolescents face this risk. These huge numbers are what propel me to insist on a grain-free diet with my clients. The risks of gluten antibodies attacking any cell of the body are just too great. In particular, low zinc levels have been linked to depression. In addition to keeping the immune system and prostate strong and the memory sharp, zinc plays an important role in the production and use of neurotransmitters.  A 2009 study found that zinc supplementation significantly reduced depression scores in people who had not been helped by antidepressants in the past.

Getting off grains is a “Wild Card” in that you never know exactly which benefits you will see first. Sometimes depression lifts; sometimes reflux and gas just stop; sometimes, it’s that a healthy appetite replaces the constant need to refuel on starchy carbohydrates. Ultimately, it’s all managed by the brain and the intestines. Make improvements there, and the nervous system, immune system, and all the organs and cells will benefit

 

http://celiachandbook.com/neurological-effects-of-gluten/

Is GMO behind the Exploding Gluten Epidemic?

GMOs Linked to Gluten-Related Disorders

Do you or a loved one suffer from gluten sensitivity? You may be wondering why you react to gluten now even though you never did in the past. You may be wondering why a gluten-free diet has helped, but has not completely resolved your symptoms. If you are on a quest to find all of the pieces to the gluten puzzle, the following information is for you. In a report released today by the Institute for Responsible Technology, a team of experts proposes a possible link between genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and gluten-related disorders. The analysis is based on Dept. of Agriculture data, Environmental Protection Act records, medical journal reviews, and international research.

The full 24-page report, a press release, and a recorded interview can all be found atglutenandgmos.com. An article summarizing the findings of this report is presented below:

Can Genetically Engineered Foods Trigger Gluten Sensitivity?

Gluten sensitivity is currently estimated to affect as many as 18 million Americans. 1 Reactions togluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley, are becoming increasingly common. Gluten sensitivity can range in severity from mild discomfort, such as gas and bloating, to celiac disease, a serious autoimmune condition that can, if undiagnosed, result in a 4-fold increase in death. 2 Genetics alone cannot explain the rapid rise in gluten-related disorders, and experts believe that there must be an environmental trigger. There continues to be much debate about what that environmental trigger may be.

Some assert that a higher gluten content of modern wheat is to blame for the rising prevalence of gluten-related disorders. 3 But a 2013 review of data commissioned by the United States Department of Agriculture found no evidence to support this. 4 Others blame increased consumption of wheat overall, 4 age of wheat introduction, 5 cesarean birth, 6 breastfeeding duration, 7 or alterations in intestinal microflora. 8 All of these do offer some explanation, but they cannot completely account for the drastic increase in gluten sensitivities that we have seen in recent years.

Another possible environmental trigger may be the introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to the American food supply, which occurred in the mid-1990s. GMOs are created by a laboratory process that transfers genetic material into the DNA of an organism There are nine genetically modified (GM) food crops currently on the market: soy, corn, cotton (oil), canola (oil), sugar from sugar beets, zucchini, yellow squash, Hawaiian papaya, and alfalfa. Notice that wheat is notone of these. Although wheat has been hybridized through natural breeding techniques over the years, it is not in fact a GMO.

Most GM crops are engineered to tolerate a weed killer called Roundup®, whose active ingredient is glyphosate. These crops, known as Roundup-Ready crops, accumulate high levels of glyphosate that remain in the food.  Corn and cotton varieties are also engineered to produce an insecticide called Bt-toxin. The Bt-toxin is produced in every cell of genetically engineered corn and ends up in corn chips, corn tortillas, and other ingredients derived from corn. A recent analysis of research suggests that Bt-toxin, glyphosate, and other components of GMOs, are linked to five conditions that may either initiate or exacerbate gluten-related disorders:

  1. Intestinal permeability
  2. Imbalanced gut bacteria
  3. Immune activation and allergies
  4. Impaired digestion
  5. Damage to the intestinal wall

Intestinal permeability

Gluten-related disorders are commonly accompanied by and possibly triggered by intestinal permeability, which is commonly referred to as “leaky gut.”9 Leaky gut occurs when gaps form between intestinal cells and large particles from the digestive tract enter the bloodstream, potentially triggering immune or allergic reactions. The Bt-toxin produced by genetically modified corn kills insects by punching holes in their digestive tracts, and a 2012 study confirmed that it punctures holes in human cells as well.10 Bt-toxin is present in every kernel of Bt corn, survives human digestion, and has been detected in the blood of 93% of pregnant women tested and 80% of their unborn fetuses.11 This “hole-punching toxin” may be a critical piece of the puzzle in understanding gluten-related disorders.

Imbalanced gut bacteria

Gluten-sensitive individuals, and especially those with celiac disease, also commonly have an imbalance in their gut flora.12,13,14,15 The reason that cesarean section increases risk 6 and breastfeeding decreases risk 7 for gluten sensitivity is likely due to their respective effects on microbial balance in the infant’s gut. 16 Glyphosate used on GM crops is not only an herbicide, but also a potent antibiotic.Even with minimal exposure, glyphosate can significantly reduce the population of beneficial gut bacteria and promote the overgrowth of harmful strains.17 18 An overgrowth of harmful bacteria can promote inflammation, leaky gut, and immune reactions, all of which are linked to gluten-related disorders.

News Release: GMOS Linked to Exploding Gluten Sensitivity Epidemic (FREE PDF)

Immune activation and allergies

Many people do not develop reactivity to gluten until later in life, which supports the notion that it can be triggered by environmental factors. The only study to date that has been able to effectively trigger an immunological shift to gluten sensitivity was done in mice in 2011. 19 The study showed that retinoic acid, a metabolite of vitamin A, activated a specific immune response to gluten under inflammatory conditions in the gut. It turns out that glyphosate, the primary herbicide used on GM crops, increases retinoic acid activity. 20 If glyphosate activates retinoic acid, and retinoic acid activates gluten sensitivity, eating GMOs soaked with glyphosate may play a role in the onset of glute-related disorders.

Bt-toxin may also activate the immune system. When mice were exposed to Bt-toxin, they not only mounted an immune response to it directly, but they subsequently reacted to foods that had not formerly triggered a response.21 There was something about the Bt-toxin that primed the immune system to become reactive to other, once benign, foods. If humans exposed to Bt-toxin react in a similar manner, eating GM corn could directly lead to the development of gluten or other food sensitivities.

Impaired digestion

Decreased digestive enzymes can create undigested food particles, contribute to the overgrowth of harmful bacteria, and promote symptoms of gluten-related disorders. Studies of mice eating Roundup Ready soy and fish exposed to glyphosate show that these compounds reduce digestive enzymes. 2223 All soybeans contain trypsin inhibitor, which blocks an important enzyme needed to digest protein, but Roundup Ready® soybeans contain as much as seven times more than non-GMO soy.24,25 The results of these studies suggest that genetically engineered foods may lead to serious digestive compromise.

Damage to the intestinal wall

A common result of gluten sensitivity is damage to the lining of the intestinal tract. Celiac disease results in flattening of the microvilli lining the walls of the intestine. Both Bt-toxin and glyphosate have produced structural damage to microvilli in animal studies; animals exposed to these substances developed microvilli that were broken off, discontinuous, or shortened. 26 23

Stay Away from GMOs

A clear explanation for the rising rate of gluten-related disorders remains elusive. Multiple factors interact, with no clear or original cause. But genetically modified foods and their primary chemical residue, glyphosate, may be an important piece of the puzzle. Whether GMOs are indeed a causative factor in the escalating trend of gluten sensitivity or merely an obstacle to cure is yet to be determined.

Many clinicians already prescribe non-GMO diets for their gluten-sensitive patients. Physicians and patients have reported improvement in their symptoms after eliminating GMOs from their diets. Internist, Emily Linder MD, says, “Based on my clinical experience, when I remove genetically modified foods as part of the treatment for gluten sensitivity, recovery is faster and more complete. I believe that GMOs in our diet contribute to the rise in gluten sensitivity in the U.S. population.”

Unfortunately, many people who discover they are gluten-sensitive actually increase their intake of GMOs because they switch from wheat products to corn products. With 88% of the U.S. corn crop genetically engineered, avoidance of GMOs in the gluten-free community presents a unique challenge to consumers.

The best way to avoid GMOs is to consult the NonGMOShoppingGuide.com or download the free iPhone app ShopNoGMO. Look for products with either the “Non-GMO Project Verified” or the “Certified Organic” seal. Avoid ingredients derived from the foods most likely to be genetically modified. These include soy, corn, cottonseed, canola, sugar, papaya from Hawaii or China, zucchini, and yellow squash.

If you have seen improvement in a gluten-related condition after eliminating GMOs from your diet, please email healthy@responsibletechnology.org to share your story.

If you have a friend or relative suffering from gluten sensitivity, ask them if they eat GMOs and forward this email to them!

Help us to reclaim a non-GMO food supply

Wheat Threatens All Humans, New Research Shows

Very interesting information. Not really shocked, I must say.

Bun

 

by David Perlmutter, MD

Bread lovers beware! Gluten-free diets may not just be a trendy choice but something everyone should follow. New research reveals that proteins in wheat may be detrimental to all humans.
“Gluten-free” seems to be appearing just about everywhere these days, from restaurant menus to grocery store shelves and even on cosmetics labels. And with good reason. The gluten-free market is exploding. Packaged Facts, a market research company estimated that the gluten-free market in the United States was $4.2 billion last year and predicts an expansion to $6.6 billion by 2017.In a recent Time Magazine article entitled: “Why We’re Wasting Billions on Gluten-Free Foods,” business writer Martha C. White puzzled over this seemingly baseless trend, stating: “As food fads go, though, this one’s not only enormous: It’s enormously expensive—and many of us paying a premium to avoid gluten are doing so without any legitimate medical reason.”The article goes on to describe how less than 1% of Americans suffer from celiac disease, an autoimmune disease triggered by gluten consumption and how as many as 1 in 16 Americans may have a significant sensitivity to gluten, a disease for which the term “non-celiac gluten sensitivity” was recently developed by anexpert panel of gluten researchers and clinicians.No doubt it is in the best interest of these two groups to avoid consuming gluten, a protein found in wheat as well as barley, rye, and spelt products. But is thestatistic that as many as 29% of Americans admit to trying to maintain a gluten-free diet simply an indication of their desire to remain trendy? If in fact only a small fraction of Americans actually have a medical condition exacerbated by gluten consumption, what could explain the overwhelming traction of the gluten-free movement?A Google search for gluten-free websites produces over 7.5 million returns with many of these sites populated by incredible testimonials of miraculous improvements following the adoption of a gluten-free diet in a wide range of medical issues including headaches, joint pain, skin disorders, epilepsy, depression, insomnia, and ADHD, to name a few. If we are to believe that only a small number of us should avoid gluten, does that relegate these personal triumphs from a dietary change to simply a placebo effect?

Good science would mandate that we should consider the possibility that something else may happen when a person chooses to eliminate wheat that may have nothing to do with reactivity to gluten.

While gluten makes up the lion’s share of protein in wheat, research reveals that modern wheat is capable of producing more than 23,000 different proteins, any one of which could trigger a potentially damaging inflammatory response. One protein in particular is wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). WGA is classified as alectin—a term for a protein produced by an organism to protect itself from predation.

All grains produce lectins, which selectively bind to unique proteins on the surfaces of bacteria, fungi, and insects. These proteins are found throughout the animal kingdom. One protein in particular for which WGA has an extremely high affinity is N-Acetylglucosamine. N-Acetylglucosamine richly adorns the casing of insects and plays an important role in the structure of the cellular walls of bacteria. More importantly, it is a key structural component in humans in a variety of tissues, including tendons, joint surfaces, cartilage, the lining of the entire digestive tract, and even the lining of the hundreds of miles of blood vessels found within each of us.

Scientific research is now giving us yet another reason to reconsider the merits of our daily bread.

It is precisely the ability of WGA to bind to proteins lining the gut that raises concern amongst medical researchers. When WGA binds to these proteins, it may leave these cells less well protected against the harmful effects of the gut contents.

WGA may also have direct toxic effects on the heart, endocrine, and immune systems, and even the brain. In fact, so readily does WGA make its way into the brain that scientists are actually testing it as a possible means of delivering medicines in an attempt to treat Alzheimer’s disease.

And again, the concern here is not just for a small segment of the population who happened to inherit susceptibility for sensitivity to gluten. This is a concern as it relates to all humans. As medical researcher Sayer Ji stated, “What is unique about WGA is that it can do direct damage to the majority of tissues in the human body without requiring a specific set of genetic susceptibilities and/or immune-mediated articulations. This may explain why chronic inflammatory and degenerative conditions are endemic to wheat-consuming populations even when overt allergies or intolerances to wheat gluten appear exceedingly rare.”

The gluten issue is indeed very real and threatening. But it now seems clear that lectin proteins found in wheat may harbor the potential for even more detrimental effects on human health. It is particularly alarming to consider the fact that there is a move to actually genetically modify wheat to enhance its WGA content.

Scientific research is now giving us yet another reason to reconsider the merits of our daily bread. The story of WGA’s potential destructive effects on human health is just beginning to be told. We should embrace the notion that low levels of exposure to any toxin over an extended period can lead to serious health issues. And this may well characterize the under-recognized threat of wheat consumption for all humans.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/12/10/wheat-threatens-all-humans-new-research-shows.html

Health, a personal journey

As I was standing in the check-out lane at my daily grocery stop, I realized that we are all so quick to judge others. This definitely includes health and the choices that we make. I caught myself as I stood there, comparing my groceries to the other people in line. I may not be normal, but I know that we all do it to a certain degree.
What I realized above all of this is, when I started this journey to better health, I had very little knowledge of SCD, Gluten Free or Paleo diets. We all have to learn slowly(if at all) and gain our confidence with new information. I had a friend a couple of years ago that started a paleo diet and I didn’t quite get it at the time, but have come to understand that it is our best chance for health and healing in our family moving forward. It seemed so foreign at the time but now, I appreciate the lessons that I learned from hearing about his diet back then. Thank you, Trevor!
We can be so hard on other people.
Why do we expect other people to know what we know? Do what we do?
We are each on our own journey. I can’t help but think that fights, arguments and wars could be avoided if we understood this better, when dealing with people.
This article shows how even the food industry is on a learning to make better choices.

Wheat producers

Wheat threatens all humans

Another friend of mine confirms that she too, judges other people and their grocery choices. Vegecation!

Honest apology from restaurant server

I worked in restaurants for many years and like this person, I know that the information that we had about Celiac disease was so poor and inaccurate. I remember one chef telling me what a celiac person might get for symptoms if they got “glutened”. He said “they will get a tummy ache for a couple of days”.
It made me mad then, because I knew better and he was going to go on teaching many more cooks and servers his incredibly, insensitive information!

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Here is a post from glutendude.com.

Wow…check out the following email I received yesterday.

It is honest, sad and scary all wrapped into one.

It is from a long-time restaurant server who spent years not taking celiac disease seriously for her customers.

She is now being tested for celiac disease.

Here is her confession.

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This is my apology.

I am sorry. I am very very sorry.

Until I recently began the roller coaster ride of medical testing in an attempt to discover if I have Celiac disease, I had no idea. I didn’t know about cross contamination. I didn’t know that a small amount of gluten could hurt someone for so long.

I worked for many years as a server and I had no idea. I worked in many different restaurants, in many different kitchens with many different chefs, and still I had no idea.

I thought I understood what it meant if a customer told me they had Celiac disease.

I didn’t.

If a nut or other allergy was mentioned, I went out of my way to make sure the meal was delivered as safely as possible. But I never received any training about Celiac disease.

I can vividly recall a plate of gluten free pasta being served up – head chef plates it, generous helping of sauce. And the sous-chef, without thinking, adds fresh garlic bread to the side of the plate.

I pick it up, whisk the garlic bread off and deliver the plate to the customer.

What happened to that poor person?? This never would have happened with shellfish or nuts in the case of an allergy.

And so for this I apologize. I don’t know how to make it better.

How many servers are out there simply whisking garlic bread off the plate? How many crumbs are falling into our meals?

I’m still trying to discover what exactly my relationship with gluten needs to be, but in the process I’m discovering a community. They help me in the grocery store and reading their stories here are helping me too.

Thanks Gluten Dude!

And sorry everyone.

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This is not about karma. She did not have this disease “coming to her”.

This is about the ignorance of the restaurant industry.

It’s about the continued harm the pseudo gluten-free crowd is causing us.

It’s about Kim Kardashian and Miley Cyrus and Gwyneth Paltrow and Lady Gaga all contributing to the over-exposure of gluten-free.

Hell…I’m sick of hearing about it.

And lastly, it’s about somebody coming to grips with her past and her future.
http://glutendude.com/celiac/celiac-confessions-of-a-waitress/