Tag Archives: disease

Monsanto Story, Not Really Evil

The other day I was driving along and was thinking about how Monsanto thought up the evil, disease making crap that they have convinced most world powers to purchase and feed to their citizens. I’m not convinced that it was as deliberately orchestrated, as we always think. What I came up with is my vision of a group of Monsanteurs and a brainstorming session:

Ok. So we have to come up with a way to sell all this excess crap we have left over, rotting in the yard. No one will take it away and we can’t just dump it in the rivers anymore. After that Anniston thing, we have got this big target on our backs.

After WWII we have all this left over poison and it is just sitting there killing all the grass and stuff.

Ya. The grounds keeper says that it is seeping in and around the trees. He says that it is killing everything around there. It sounds kind of bad, because he said that some birds have died in that area as well. We have to do something about it!

Why won’t anyone take it away? Will that disposal company we used to use not come and pick it up?

They said that it is too dangerous and they don’t want to be responsible for this stuff that we made. They claim it is too toxic to dispose it safely. Pffft!

Why don’t we sell this to farmers to kill the weeds in their fields if it is killing all the weeds and grass in our yard?

Well, if it kills all the weeds and grass, won’t it also kill the crops that they are selling??

Thinking….

What if we tried that new thing that R & D was working on?

You know…make the crops so that the weed killer, stuff we want to sell, doesn’t kill the crops, just the weeds??

Yeah! That way we can get them coming and  going! We can sell the seeds and the poison to kill everything else!

Well that is so good! Is there any chance that people will get sick from putting this into food?

Who cares. Let’s just pay some scientist friends to write papers that say it is safe. We have lots of friends in government that will help us get these things worked out.

We can hire some of those politicians to work here and help us get stuff passed.

Ya. Ya.

If we do this stuff, we can sell our chemicals and seeds to everyone! Do you realize, that if we can pull this off, we will OWN food! That is just crazy. We have to do this!

 

 

That is how I imagined it kind of went. Sad but truish.

“You Might Not Be Getting All the Nutrients You Need, Eating That Way”

“You must have healthy grains as part of your diet.”

Do you hear this sentiment from friends and family?

Our society has been brainwashed into believing bull-caca!

If you are like me, you don’t believe “conventional” wisdom as far as you can throw it!

You may feel like you are swimming upstream sometimes, trying to keep you and your family healthy while government, relatives, and big business try to feed you loads of crap they call food!

When we tell people that we only eat fruit, vegetables, meat, fish, seeds and nuts, their immediate response is, “….what do you eat then?”

Many will wonder (because they are programmed the same way we were), how we are able to sustain our children on a diet without “whole grains?”

Some brave souls may even ask, “But what about all the healthy fibres that they are missing out on?”

I am here to tell you, you are not alone if you are getting these questions.

If you are maybe wondering yourself, then hopefully I can help you, and shed some light on this murky subject.

We didn’t get a choice when our daughter was in pain and the typical gluten free diet wasn’t the final answer. We had to hit the drawing board once again. This was the second time in less than 2 years that we had to redefine our diet, and pore through endless websites and books to try to find a solution that none of our doctors could give us.

We made a bold decision to take these things out of our diet, out of sheer desperation. We didn’t have answers, so we had to go for it and pray to God that this might fix what continued to give our daughter the excruciating discomfort, with no name.

Well, I’m here to tell you that you can survive, nay, thrive!

We are essentially following the Paleo diet, but I resist saying that because I feel it is more of a dissection of the food pyramid, or a back-to-basics-plan. I also know that people have a preconceived image of someone on a Paleo diet.

Here are the reasons that I follow the diet and want my family to learn how to do the same:

  • My full time job involves dealing with many chronically sick people, some are quite young (and I don’t want to end up that way)
  • After dealing with our immediate family diet needs, I started to look back on other family members and their ailments
  • I truly believe that health and longevity starts in your mind. If you believe you are healthy, you are.
  • Falling apart as we age is not supposed to happen at the rate that we have become accustomed to
  • The rates of autoimmune diseases, cancers, allergies and general sickness continues to go up despite advances in medicine (Cancer cases to rise 57%, Autoimmune disease on the rise, Food allergies on the rise)

I find that health is personal and people have to stand up for their beliefs. When you make changes as drastic as this, you are always going to have someone or something challenging you. You have be firm in your belief and remember it is YOUR health.

Dining out, family engagements, parties, holidays are all different and can be challenging. I suggest joining a group of like-minded people or some sort of Paleo community, as it helps to have people to share your thoughts with.

Stay healthy!

Article from the famous Mark Sisson:Why Grains Are Unhealthy

Doctor Reverses Multiple Sclerosis in 9 Months by Eating These Foods

What is the Paleo Diet by Robb Wolf

 

Are you sure you want to eat that?

It has been about three years since finding out that our daughter is celiac. In this time we asked “why us”? Became frustrated at the lack of “good” information, considered not eating anymore… We(as anyone that has to make drastic dietary changes goes through) struggled when told that certain things were not available to us anymore. We were pained by the decision that we still work through today.

Whether the whole family should eat the same way or just those affected??
When one person has dietary needs(outside of societies version of normal) the whole family is affected to a certain degree. We try not to let it change relationships, but that really can’t be helped.
In the process of finding our way to health for H, we have learned much about food and the processes that our society has become familiar with, not necessarily the best decisions, but familiar!
I call this Easy-fast-processed-manipulated-itis.

fast food collection on on white background
I know that making good health choices is hard! This is even harder because our governments, medical professionals, dietitians, etc. are spreading poor information and promoting it!
Have you seen or heard any of the horror stories of illnesses in our families and friends? It is epidemic!

In my family alone, there is celiac disease, gluten/dairy intolerance, fibromyalgia, prostate cancer, MS, gout, arthritis, high blood pressure…I would consider our family pretty healthy compared to some.
The Canada food guide is so misleading and based on poor information. It seems that their reason to promote dairy and grain is based on economics as opposed to overall health.

Do governments think that it is too disruptive to actually look into why we are becoming more sick and this next generation will be the first in our known history to have a shorter life span than the previous one?

How bad does it have to become before we make changes to our food systems?

Why is it that people who want to grow healthy, simple crops(organic) have more hoops to jump through, than a farmer that wants to use pesticides and chemicals?

PESTICIDESpesticide_spraying_seed_crops_250

Obesity Threatens to Cut U.S. Life Expectancy, New Analysis Suggests

Over the next few decades, life expectancy for the average American could decline by as much as 5 years unless aggressive efforts are made to slow rising rates of obesity, according to a team of scientists supported in part by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

The U.S. could be facing its first sustained drop in life expectancy in the modern era, the researchers say, but this decline is not inevitable if Americans — particularly younger ones — trim their waistlines or if other improvements outweigh the impact of obesity. The new report in the March 17, 2005 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine appears little more than a year after the DHHS unveiled a new national education campaign and research strategy to combat obesity and excessive weight.

The new analysis, by S. Jay Olshansky, PhD, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, Leonard Hayflick, Ph.D., of the University of California, San Francisco, Robert N. Butler, M.D., of the International Longevity Center in New York, and others* suggests that the methods used to establish life expectancy projections, which have long been based on historic trends, need to be reassessed. This reevaluation is particularly important, they say, as obesity rates surge in today’s children and young adults.

“Forecasting life expectancy by extrapolating from the past is like forecasting the weather on the basis of its history,” Olshansky and his colleagues write. “Looking out the window, we see a threatening storm — obesity —that will, if unchecked, have a negative effect on life expectancy.”

Unlike historic life expectancy forecasts, which rely on past mortality trends, the Olshansky group bases their projection on an analysis of body mass indexes and other factors that could potentially affect the health and well-being of the current generation of children and young adults, some of whom began having weight problems very early in life. The authors say that unless steps are taken to curb excessive weight gain, younger Americans will likely face a greater risk of mortality throughout life than previous generations.

“This work paints a disturbing portrait of the potential effect that life styles of baby boomers and the next generation could have on life expectancy,” says Richard M. Suzman, Ph.D., Associate Director of the NIA for Behavioral and Social Research. Indeed, Suzman notes, obesity may already have had an effect. The sharp increase of obesity among people now in their 60s, he suggests, may be one explanation why the gains in U.S. life expectancy at older ages have been less than those of other developed countries in recent years.

“But it is critical to note that the reduced life expectancy forecast by the study is not inevitable, and there is room for optimism,” Suzman says. “Government and private sector efforts are mobilizing against obesity, and increased education, improved medical treatments, and reduced smoking can tip the balance in favor of reduced mortality and continued improvements in life expectancy.”

For instance, smoking significantly reduces the life expectancy of the average smoker, Suzman says, so obesity is just one of many factors that will need to be accounted for, together or separately, in projecting how Americans will age. The NIA supports several projects on population demography that forecast life and health expectancy, research which is critically important to policy makers looking at the implications of an aging population.

According to the NEJM report, studies suggest that two-thirds of American adults are overweight (having a body mass index — BMI — of 25 or more) or obese (having a BMI of 30 or more)**. One study cited by the authors indicates that the prevalence of obesity in U.S. adults has increased about 50 percent per decade since 1980. Additional research has shown that people who are severely obese — with a BMI greater than 45 — live up to 20 years less than people who are not overweight. Some researchers have estimated that obesity causes about 300,000 deaths in the U.S. annually. In addition, obesity is fueling an epidemic of type 2 diabetes, which also reduces lifespan.

To estimate the overall effect of obesity on life expectancy in the U.S., Olshansky and his colleagues calculated the reduction in death rates that would occur if everyone who is currently obese were to achieve the difficult goal of losing enough weight to reach an “optimal” BMI of 24. The calculation was based, in part, on age, race, and sex-specific prevalence of obesity in the United States from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Based on these calculations, the researchers estimated that life expectancy at birth would be higher by 0.33 to 0.93 year for white men, 0.30 to 0.81 year for white women, 0.30 to 1.08 year for black men, and 0.21 to 0.73 year for black women if obesity did not exist.

The overall reduction in life expectancy of one-third to three-fourths of a year attributed to obesity in this analysis exceeds the negative effect of all accidental deaths combined, and could deteriorate over time, the researchers said.

“These trends suggest that the relative influence of obesity on the life expectancy of future generations could be markedly worse than it is for current generations,” Olshansky and the authors conclude in their report. “In other words, the life-shortening effect of obesity could rise …to two to five years, or more, in the coming decades, as the obese who are now at younger ages carry their elevated risk of death into middle and older ages.”

The projected decline contrasts with estimates by other leading researchers, which predict a continuation of the historic trend of increasing life expectancy in America and Europe dating back to the 1850s, according to Dr. Suzman. In fact, he points out that the experience of other developed nations is instructive as a barometer of how much room might exist to increase U.S. life expectancy. More than 20 other developed nations, including France, Japan, Germany, Sweden, and the United Kingdom have a higher average life expectancy than the U.S. Women in Japan, for example, live about 5 years longer than women in the U.S. There is little evidence that life expectancy in these countries is approaching any kind of limit, Suzman says.

In March 2004, the DHHS launched public awareness campaign, entitled Healthy Lifestyles and Disease Prevention, to encourage American families to take small, manageable steps within their current lifestyle, such as using the stairs instead of the elevator, to ensure effective, long-term weight control. The campaign includes multi-media public service announcements (PSAs) and a new interactive website,www.smallstep.gov.

In addition, the NIA has developed a free exercise guide for older adults, which is available online at www.nia.nih.gov. The NIH and other Federal agencies also offer free information about excessive weight and what can be done about it, including the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/choosing.htm, the Food and Drug Administrationhttp://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/wh-wght.html, and the Federal Consumer Information Center http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/health/works4you/weightloss.htm.

This research was also supported by the Institute of Government and Public Affairs at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Charles H. Hood Foundation.

The NIA is one of 27 Institutes and Centers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), part of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. The NIA leads the Federal Government effort conducting and supporting research on the biomedical and social and behavioral aspects of aging and the problems of older people. For more information on aging-related research and the NIA, please visit the NIA website at www.nia.nih.gov. The public may also call for publications describing these efforts and offering health information for older people and their families at 1-800-222-2225, the toll free number for the National Institute on Aging Information Center.

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/mar2005/nia-16.htm

I guess that the only thing to do now is decide. Decide to change our own lives or to continue the way that we have been accustomed to .

It is unfortunate, but such a human trait, to resist change and to not make changes until your life is threatened.

Changes are difficult at first, but if you are motivated you can change anything.

food pill

I can’t help but think, that our grandparents had it right. Simpler time, simpler way=more work.  Our grandmothers(for the most part) spent a lot of time in the kitchen preparing fresh, nutritious meals. They gardened, bought fresh meats and vegetables from their neighbours. This takes time and planning. It seems like a lot of work when you consider the alternatives like frozen pizza or fast food.

I am realizing that preparing fresh, nutritious food for your family is one of the most rewarding experiences that I have had. I know it will be one thing that I will pass on to my girls so that they can in turn, be healthy and make the world a better place for their families.

sidekicks

I thought it was interesting when I did a google search for “Food be medicine”, my first result was the US food and drug administration!

Do you really think that they have your health as a first priority?

Quote from Dr Mark Hyman

U.S. Dietary Guidelines provide no limit for added sugar, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) still lists sugar as a “generally regarded as safe” (GRAS) substance.

Here are some helpful links if you are interested in healthy alternatives. God bless.

http://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/explore-healing-practices/food-medicine

http://drhyman.com/blog/2011/10/14/eat-your-medicine-food-as-pharmacology/#close

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/5-food-medicines-could-quite-possibly-save-your-life

 http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mark-hyman/sugar-heart-attack_b_4746440.html

 

Heart surgeon comes clean on real cause of heart disease

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We physicians with all our experience, know how and authority often acquire a rather large selfishness that tends to make it hard to accept we are wrong. So, here it is. I openly admit to being mistaken. As a heart surgeon with 25 years experience, having done more than 5,000 open-heart surgeries, today is my day to right the wrong with medical and scientific proof.

I trained for many years with other prominent physicians labelled “opinion makers.” Bombarded with scientific literature, continually attending education seminars, we opinion makers insisted heart disease resulted from the simple fact of elevated blood cholesterol.

The only accepted therapy was prescribing medications to lower cholesterol and a diet that severely restricted fat intake. The latter of course we insisted would lower cholesterol and heart disease. Deviations from these recommendations were considered heresy and could quite possibly result in malpractice.

It Is Not Working!

These recommendations are no longer scientifically or morally defensible. The discovery a few years ago that inflammation in the artery wall is the real cause of heart disease is slowly leading to a paradigm shift in how heart disease and other chronic ailments will be treated.

The long-established dietary recommendations have created epidemics of obesity and diabetes, the consequences of which dwarf any historical plague in terms of mortality, human suffering and dire economic consequences.

Despite the fact that 25% of the population takes expensive statin medications and despite the fact we have reduced the fat content of our diets, more Americans will die this year of heart disease than ever before.

Statistics from the American Heart Association show that 75 million Americans currently suffer from heart disease, 20 million have diabetes and 57 million have pre-diabetes. These disorders are affecting younger and younger people in greater numbers every year.

Simply stated, without inflammation being present in the body, there is no way that cholesterol would accumulate in the wall of the blood vessel and cause heart disease and strokes. Without inflammation, cholesterol would move freely throughout the body as nature intended. It is inflammation that causes cholesterol to become trapped.

Inflammation is not complicated — it is quite simply your body’s natural defence to a foreign invader such as a bacteria, toxin or virus. The cycle of inflammation is perfect in how it protects your body from these bacterial and viral invaders. However, if we chronically expose the body to injury by toxins or foods the human body was never designed to process,a condition occurs called chronic inflammation. Chronic inflammation is just as harmful as acute inflammation is beneficial.

What thoughtful person would willfully expose himself repeatedly to foods or other substances that are known to cause injury to the body? Well, smokers perhaps, but at least they made that choice willfully.

The rest of us have simply followed the recommended mainstream diet that is low in fat and high in polyunsaturated fats and carbohydrates, not knowing we were causing repeated injury to our blood vessels. This repeated injury creates chronic inflammation leading to heart disease, stroke, diabetes and obesity.

Let me repeat that: The injury and inflammation in our blood vessels is caused by the low fat diet recommended for years by mainstream medicine.

What are the biggest culprits of chronic inflammation? Quite simply, they are the overload of simple, highly processed carbohydrates (sugar, flour and all the products made from them) and the excess consumption of omega-6 vegetable oils like soybean, corn and sunflower that are found in many processed foods.

Take a moment to visualize rubbing a stiff brush repeatedly over soft skin until it becomes quite red and nearly bleeding. you kept this up several times a day, every day for five years. If you could tolerate this painful brushing, you would have a bleeding, swollen infected area that became worse with each repeated injury. This is a good way to visualize the inflammatory process that could be going on in your body right now.

Regardless of where the inflammatory process occurs, externally or internally, it is the same. I have peered inside thousands upon thousands of arteries. A diseased artery looks as if someone took a brush and scrubbed repeatedly against its wall. Several times a day, every day, the foods we eat create small injuries compounding into more injuries, causing the body to respond continuously and appropriately with inflammation.

While we savor the tantalizing taste of a sweet roll, our bodies respond alarmingly as if a foreign invader arrived declaring war. Foods loaded with sugars and simple carbohydrates, or processed with omega-6 oils for long shelf life have been the mainstay of the American diet for six decades. These foods have been slowly poisoning everyone.

How does eating a simple sweet roll create a cascade of inflammation to make you sick?

Imagine spilling syrup on your keyboard and you have a visual of what occurs inside the cell. When we consume simple carbohydrates such as sugar, blood sugar rises rapidly. In response, your pancreas secretes insulin whose primary purpose is to drive sugar into each cell where it is stored for energy. If the cell is full and does not need glucose, it is rejected to avoid extra sugar gumming up the works.

When your full cells reject the extra glucose, blood sugar rises producing more insulin and the glucose converts to stored fat.

What does all this have to do with inflammation? Blood sugar is controlled in a very narrow range. Extra sugar molecules attach to a variety of proteins that in turn injure the blood vessel wall. This repeated injury to the blood vessel wall sets off inflammation. When you spike your blood sugar level several times a day, every day, it is exactly like taking sandpaper to the inside of your delicate blood vessels.

While you may not be able to see it, rest assured it is there. I saw it in over 5,000 surgical patients spanning 25 years who all shared one common denominator — inflammation in their arteries.

Let’s get back to the sweet roll. That innocent looking goody not only contains sugars, it is baked in one of many omega-6 oils such as soybean. Chips and fries are soaked in soybean oil; processed foods are manufactured with omega-6 oils for longer shelf life. While omega-6′s are essential -they are part of every cell membrane controlling what goes in and out of the cell — they must be in the correct balance with omega-3′s.

If the balance shifts by consuming excessive omega-6, the cell membrane produces chemicals called cytokines that directly cause inflammation.

Today’s mainstream American diet has produced an extreme imbalance of these two fats. The ratio of imbalance ranges from 15:1 to as high as 30:1 in favor of omega-6. That’s a tremendous amount of cytokines causing inflammation. In today’s food environment, a 3:1 ratio would be optimal and healthy.

To make matters worse, the excess weight you are carrying from eating these foods creates overloaded fat cells that pour out large quantities of pro-inflammatory chemicals that add to the injury caused by having high blood sugar. The process that began with a sweet roll turns into a vicious cycle over time that creates heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and finally, Alzheimer’s disease, as the inflammatory process continues unabated.

There is no escaping the fact that the more we consume prepared and processed foods, the more we trip the inflammation switch little by little each day. The human body cannot process, nor was it designed to consume, foods packed with sugars and soaked in omega-6 oils.

There is but one answer to quieting inflammation, and that is returning to foods closer to their natural state. To build muscle, eat more protein. Choose carbohydrates that are very complex such as colorful fruits and vegetables. Cut down on or eliminate inflammation- causing omega-6 fats like corn and soybean oil and the processed foods that are made from them.

One tablespoon of corn oil contains 7,280 mg of omega-6; soybean contains 6,940 mg. Instead, use olive oil or butter from grass-fed beef.

Animal fats contain less than 20% omega-6 and are much less likely to cause inflammation than the supposedly healthy oils labelled polyunsaturated. Forget the “science” that has been drummed into your head for decades. The science that saturated fat alone causes heart disease is non-existent. The science that saturated fat raises blood cholesterol is also very weak. Since we now know that cholesterol is not the cause of heart disease, the concern about saturated fat is even more absurd today.

The cholesterol theory led to the no-fat, low-fat recommendations that in turn created the very foods now causing an epidemic of inflammation. Mainstream medicine made a terrible mistake when it advised people to avoid saturated fat in favor of foods high in omega-6 fats. We now have an epidemic of arterial inflammation leading to heart disease and other silent killers.

What you can do is choose whole foods your grandmother served and not those your mom turned to as grocery store aisles filled with manufactured foods. By eliminating inflammatory foods and adding essential nutrients from fresh unprocessed food, you will reverse years of damage in your arteries and throughout your body from consuming the typical American diet.

By Dr. Dwight Lundell

Read more http://www.tunedbody.com/heart-surgeon-declares-really-causes-heart-illness/#

Parental guilt

We all feel guilty for some of our decisions we make regarding our children! Is there any benefit for the child or the parent?
I’m pretty sure you’re still with me here.
Over the last couple of weeks, I have been thinking about some of the things that we do for/to our kids so that we can feel less guilty for having to make those hard decisions for our children.
Recently I met a women that has similar food restrictions in her family, as we do in our home. She was telling us how, many years ago she was feeling sorry(guilty) that her child had so many restrictions on thier diet. She let them have a sandwich(the child is celiac and SCD as well) and this created many months of undesirable consequences for the child and more guilt for he parent!
I have felt the same way many times, just wondering if it is all worth it. When your friends and family scauf at you because you say stuff like “our child can’t have sugar”. They say stuff like “what candy can they have?” like you didn’t spend years with your child in pain and years of frustration trying to figure a way for them NOT to hurt! Like having sugar and cookies are the answer! Yeah, just a little of that @#it that we have all been eating for years seems to be making everyone so healthy! Don’t you think that if we didn’t really need to do this we wouldn’t?
What about those people that “cheat” as they call it?
With celiac disease I don’t see the same consequences as having that pancake breakfast when you are following weight watchers or something like it. So called, cheating is in a sense, poisoning your body and just not seeing the results for a long time. Some parents let their kids “cheat” every so often, obviously out of guilt!
Are we not here to help our children learn lessons?
Just because they are hard decisions doesn’t mean that you should feel guilty.
I urge you to not fall into that trap. It is harder to do the right thing on all accounts, but our world will soon include celiac disease and SCD the same way it has started to understand peanut allergies. Our children will be making waves and demanding choices that fit their needs.
I just finished hosting one of my best Thanksgiving dinners ever! I’m less boasting, more grateful for some of the great ideas that I have gathered from various websites plus some trial and error. http://www.againstallgrain.com/ and http://www.elanaspantry.com/ have been such a blessing for my family. When I here from others in our community and the struggles that they face with family members or friends not empathizing, I cringe at how hard this is for the parents. We have worked very hard to help our daughter to be able to understand her own body so that she will be able to tell people, with confidence, that she may not be able to eat the same way! I am grateful and blessed for every hurdle that we face, so we can learn and teach on the way to a stronger family as a whole.
We certainly all start our parental journey trepidatiously making mistakes, but hoping to learn and be better tomorrow. I’ve caught myself being critical and it sure is destructive. Be good to eachother and be good to yourself. This is valuable as a lesson to your children as much as any other subject.
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